Archive by Author | Mike Hoffman

Benevolence Farm Gives Women a Place to Live and Work After Prison

By Lisa Dzera

After being in prison for many years, assimilating back to your old life and finding a job upon release is anything but easy.

There’s the stigma with hiring ex-cons. There’s the difficult task of talking about your relevant skills in an interview when you haven’t worked in the past few years. There’s the fact that, after being treated poorly and dehumanized in prison, it’s difficult to transition to life outside of prison. There’s the reality that many of these people went to prison because they were in an environment where breaking the law was necessary to put food on the table­—and this environment will not be any different when they are released from prison.

That’s why Tanya Jisa started Benevolence Farm in Graham, North Carolina. Benevolence Farm hopes to help previously incarcerated women adjust to life outside of prison in an environment that encourages personal and career growth. These women live and work on a farm and learn the basics of running a business. Depending on their interests, they can focus on and explore different career paths, such as marketing, finance and customer relations.

“They’re not criminals,” Tanya explains. “They’re women who have had really hard choices and done the best they could.”

Tanya originally got the idea for starting Benevolence Farm when she read an article in the New York Times stating that 1 in 100 US citizens are incarcerated in our country. Because there are many more programs that work with men who were once in prison than women, Tanya wanted to create a program focusing on women.

“I went to the farmers market,” she said, “and thought, ‘What if I started up a farm for women who were coming out of prison to help them get back on their feet?’”

Tanya brought her idea to the community and received overwhelming support. She explained that there is a huge need for any services for women coming out of prison, especially housing and jobs. When women are released from prison, many are not able to find jobs, and those that do mostly find low-skill, minimum wage jobs that are not sustainable.

“We need to enable success for these women,” Tanya said.

In November 2013, 11 acres of land was donated for Benevolence Farm to use. With the financial support of the Snider Family Charitable Fund, the organization purchased a 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom house on 2 acres directly adjacent to the original 11 acres. This summer, Tanya and her team partnered with the NCSU College of Design to design and build a 985 square foot pole barn where residents will wash and prepare harvests for the farmers markets. The barn was completed on July 30.

Benevolence Farm’s first residents will arrive later this year. To decide which women will live and work at the farm, Tanya will consult with the Department of Public Safety, conduct interviews with interested candidates, and then bring currently incarcerated women who have been determined to be a good fit for the program to Benevolence Farm on a day pass to ensure that the women fully understand what will be required of them to reside on the farm. Then, on their release date, these women will be transported to Benevolence Farm, where they will stay for at least six months and up to two years. This program is targeted at women who have been in prison for 3+ years and thus need a longer period of time to get re-established.

“These are women who really want to turn it around,” Tanya explains. “They want to make a difference. They want to contribute in positive ways. They just don’t have the opportunity to do that. And so, we’re giving them that chance.”

Benevolence Farm hosts farm work days on the third Saturday of every month to get the farm ready to begin growing vegetables. To find ways to get involved, visit the Benevolence Farm Facebook page or website. And don’t miss the 2nd Annual Second Chance Dine & Dance on October 23.

The Prison Books Collective

By Lisa Dzera

Students of the World (SOW) is a national organization of university students producing multimedia stories to inspire social action. Each college chapter creates portfolios focused on the social issues its members care about. These portfolios include photography, videography, writing, and graphic design. This semester, Students of the World-UNC is focusing on education in the prison system. As its first project, Promoting Access to Prison Educational Resources (PAPER), SOW-UNC contacted the Internationalist Prison Books Collective, a nonprofit organization in Carrboro dedicated to providing books to incarcerated people.

On Sunday, February 9, 2014, students documented an average day at the Collective through photos, film and interviews with volunteers. During the workday, volunteers read letters from incarcerated people requesting particular books. They then search the Collective’s bookshelves to fill the order as completely as possible and package and send the books to prisons. SOW talked to volunteers about what got them involved with the Collective, what books were requested the most and their favorite parts about the work. Based on the interviews and information it collected, SOW-UNC will produce a video and several written pieces explaining the importance of the Collective and ways for people to get involved.

The Road to Higher Learning

By Kristi Walker

A lot of talk in North Carolina is focused on education. The benefits of well-educated citizens are unquestionable. With this in mind, our chapter is excited to announce that education will be the centerpiece of our media campaign for the rest of the school year. All of our main portfolio projects will have an education-driven theme. As highlighted in earlier posts, our first project is concentrated on Enrich ESL, a student organization in Chapel Hill that offers free English classes to people in the community.
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Enriching the community through a love of language

Student-led tutoring program teaches English to immigrants in Carrboro-Chapel Hill

By Zach Potter

Moving is tough for anyone. Getting used to a new city, finding new friends and learning how to get around are all difficult. Add in learning a whole new language and it can be downright overwhelming.

Enrich ESL, a student volunteer organization at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, aims to break down the language barriers many immigrants face upon arriving in North Carolina.

By providing one-on-one English tutoring, Enrich gives people in Chapel Hill and Carrboro a chance to learn the language while developing personal connections to the students that tutor them.
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Blue & White

Check us out in Blue & White magazine. Their article includes interviews with chapter president Wynton Wong and design lead Zach Potter. It also offers a look into our pilot project on Enrich ESL, a student-run organization that offers free English tutoring around Chapel Hill and Carrboro. Pick up a print copy or click the link to read online.

Preview 2: Enrich Project

Encrich is an ESL (English as a Second Language) program run by students from UNC Chapel Hill.  They volunteer twice a week to meet with members of the community to help them develop English language skills.

The UNC SOW group is working on a project to promote Enrich and draw attention to the great work the students are doing and the connections the volunteers make with the participants.  While the project isn’t finished, I wanted to share some of the images our photographers captured of the program in action.

Check out Enrich here.
Read More…

Preview: Enrich Project

Encrich is an ESL (English as a Second Language) program run by students from UNC Chapel Hill.  They volunteer twice a week to meet with members of the community to help them develop English language skills.

The UNC SOW group is working on a project to promote Enrich and draw attention to the great work the students are doing and the connections the volunteers make with the participants.  While the project isn’t finished, I wanted to share some of the images our photographers captured of the program in action.

Check out Enrich here.
Read More…